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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
it's now clear big decisions will have to be made soon. >> by putting social security "on the table," the president is sort of calling the g.o.p. bluff. "okay, here is social security. i've told you medicare will be on the table. are you willing to put revenue increases on the table?" >> the white house believes a $4 trillion agreement is within reach. whether it can be reached will become much clearer this weekend. darren gersh, "nightly business report," washington. california is making progress on its rating. standard and poors today raised its outlook for the golden state from negative to stable. the reason, california was able to pass its budget on time, closing what was once a $27 billion gap. here are the stories in tonight's "n.b.r. newswheel." two encouraging reports about the job market-- payroll processing firm adp says, by its count, american businesses added 157,000 jobs in june. economists were expecting many fewer. that's encouraging for an upside surprise when the labor department reports june job numbers tomorrow. also, fewer people filed for unemployment benefits l
," washington. >> tom: if richard cordray is confirmed, part of his job will be checking the books of big banks. we'll get a better idea of how they're doing in the coming days when many report quarterly earnings. by the end of this week, 40% of financial firms in the s&p 500 will have reported their numbers. as a group, the results are expected to be downright awful. erika miller reports. >> reporter: banks are the heartbeat of the economy, so their health is often used as a barometer of the recovery-- and the stock market. unfortunately for investors, bank analyst jim sinegal sees plenty of uncertainties ahead. >> in addition to macroeconomic uncertainties, with unemployment high, with g.d.p. growth slow, will the banks be able to add new loans? that's number one. number two is the regulatory uncertainty. we are still not sure where capital levels are going to fall out, and how that's going to affect profitability. >> reporter: as for profitability, diversified financials are expected to be the worst performer this earnings season-- down 94%. this is the group that includes bank of america, j
>> i am still pushing for us to achieve a big deal. >> without serious spending cuts, without real reform of our entitlement programs, this problem is not going to be solved. >> susie: republicans and democrats hold closed-door meetings, but not with each other, as both sides maintain a hardline stance on debt ceiling talks. >> tom: the white house deadline for a deal is one week away. the pressure is building as a warning is issued for life insurers holding government bonds. it's "nightly business report" for friday, july 15. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. just one more week until an important deadline, july 22. tom, that's the date when president obama wants a debt- ceiling deal in hand. >> tom: susie, an agreement by a week from tonight gives lawmakers time to write and vote on new legislation before the august 2 deadline. >> susie: it looks like
, the risk of a u.s. default is also a big worry for many older americans. they're conditioned about their monthly social security payments. now we placed several unanswered calls expecting social security checks on august 3. an additional 27 million beneficiaries expect payments later in the month. we caught up with a couple of them to see what's on their minds. >> it's a scare tactic. i mean because there's so many other things that they can stop before they stop social security checks. >> whether it is the republicans or democrats win this game, you have to remember next year is an election year again. so they're posturing themselves. and they're playing a game that is kind of tough. but again they have to get something passed sooner or later. >> susie: so far, the treasury has not provided details on how the government will decide which bills to pay if the borrowing limit is not raised. executives from the country's biggest banks met today with treasury officials in new york ahead of tuesday's deadline. they discussed how debt auctions would be handled if congress fails to raise
struggling. on top of the eurozone is a big market for u.s. multinational firms. so, it's no wonder that economist bruce kasman says it's really bad timing for a rate hike in europe. >> the euro area as a region delivers less in terms of growth as it could in helping the global economy, and then finally it adds risks and vulnerabilities to the really tough adjustments going on in greece and other peripheral countries right now. to be sure, a quarter of a percentage point increase in european rates tomorrow is likely to have only a nominal effect on u.s. growth. the concern is that the european central bank will proceed down a path of tighter monetary policy. >> the step that will be taken tomorrow by itself is not that big a deal, but the signal, if it gets realized in terms of further movements over the next six to 12 months, could have an impact in making it a little harder for the u.s. to get growth than it otherwise would. >> reporter: the good news is that buyers of u.s. stocks don't appear to be troubled by higher interest rates in other areas of the world. equity strategist a
, with the big board trading over one billion shares, nasdaq volume 2.4 billion. the economy worsened in about half the country in recent weeks due to weak home sales and signs of a slowdown in manufacturing. a federal reserve survey out today shows seven of the fed's 12 bank regions reported slower growth. and in another sign of new weakness in the economy, the commerce department says there were fewer orders of aircraft, autos, heavy machinery and computers last month. orders for durable goods fell by 2%. >> reporter: i'm diane eastabrook in orion township, michigan. still ahead, i'll tell you how general motors plans to make money selling this small car with help from the u.a.w. >> susie: can you say $1,630 an ounce? that's the new record for gold prices set today, before the precious metals encountered selling. in new york trading, gold futures lost $2 to settle at $1,617 an ounce. but, as suzanne pratt reports, gold prices could continue to shine on. >> reporter: at morningstar's jewelers and pawnbrokers in hollywood, florida, business is sparkling. but, it's business from customers looki
in the future. >> susie: let's talk a little. we were talking to a big institutional shareholder who is very concern body the outlook for this stock. would you buy news corp at $16. is this an opportunity for investors, or is it too risky? >> near term with the $5 billion share buy back that mr. murdoch announced tuesday that begins on august 5th, i think near term, it's probably a buy at news corp, but long term, you have to wait until the dust settles. there's too much uncertainty, and potential liability that the company and senior managers are facing. that want to invest long term. >> susie: there was an article in "newsweek" written by carl bernstein under the title, murdoch's watergate and saying that this is the beginning of the end of the murdoch empire. your thoughts on that. could that be the case? >> i don't think the empire is going to crumble any time soon. but what i think we are seing is perhaps an end to the celebrity type cuture ta inculcated journalism on both sides of the atlantic and has been mainly stimulateed and driven by the murdoch approach to get the news at any cos
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)